Meep

23. Married. Bibliophile. Coffee and tea are my life force. I watch a lot of TV, read a lot of manga, and obsess about books. Also, I love you.

i want a word for the almost-home.

that point where the highway’s monotony becomes familiar
that subway stop whose name will always wake you from day’s-end dozing
that first glimpse of the skyline
that you never loved until you left it behind.

what do you call the exit sign you see even in your dreams?
is there a name for the airport terminal you come back to,
comfortably exhausted?

i need a word for rounding your corner onto your street,
for seeing your city on the horizon,
for flying homewards down your highway.

give me a word for the boundary
between the world you went to see
and the small one you call your own.

i want a word for the moment you know
you’re almost home.

there and back again, n.m.h. (via anoraborealis)

(via deanasana)

fishingboatproceeds:

dcpubliclibrary:

lauriehalseanderson:

They put my thoughts about censorship on a LIBRARY in Washington, DC!!!!

Absolute career highlight!! Thank you, kind librarians!

Thanks for the inspiration lauriehalseanderson!

You can find even more awesome art inside the building in celebration of Banned Books Week and the freedom to read, express and create as part of UNCENSORED: The Art Exhibition.

Laurie’s words three stories tall. Awesome.

(via tessaviolet)

(Most of) Awesome Mix, Vol. 1

(via sethmeyers)

profoundboner:

bpdlevi:

"you’re obsessed with your mental illness"

i know right? it’s almost like it impacts every part of my life

"it’s all in your head"

I know right? it’s almost like it’s a mental illness

(via recoveringtopanga)

canmakedothink:

-teesa-:

9.2.14

PROTECT JESSICA WILLIAMS AT ALL COSTS.

(via stophatingyourbody)

randomlancila:

Stereotyping does not occur in a vacuum. It’s the first step on a really dark path. Words mean things. Assumptions mean things. Be aware of this.

(via stophatingyourbody)

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

(via stophatingyourbody)

(via stophatingyourbody)

How does racism against white people not exist?
meeptastic meeptastic Said:

mellomaia:

misandry-mermaid:

Personal discrimination against white people exists.  But racism is systemic and white supremacy makes for a skewed power imbalance in which white people do not face institutionalized oppression based on their race.

Whenever I see a question like this on the Internet, I tend to see the “racism is systemic” explanation go over people’s heads. I would like to offer an extension of this explanation. I, like many people, was taught in school that racism is either believing your own race to be superior or hating individuals of other races. Using these definitions and not considering historical (or present) context, one can certainly argue that racism goes both ways. 

However, context is everything, so let’s consider it. It is true that more and more people have friendships or otherwise positive relationships with people of different races. For this reason, I think that, when many white people hear someone accuse their actions as being racist, they think, “That’s ridiculous, how can I hate my friends?” Further, compared to earlier times, it is becoming rarer for people to publicly announce that they hate someone of a particular race or that they think their own race is superior. If you were to consider this and only this, you might come to the conclusion that there’s no more racism or that it’s on its way out. 

But if there’s no racism, why are people with whose names imply that they are white (e.g. Steve Jones) more likely to be called back for job interviews than people whose names imply that they are POC (e.g. Tahani Tompkins), even when they have similar credentials? x x

Why are white people less likely to see films where the majority of the cast consists of black people or other POC? x

Why are all-white juries more likely to convict black defendants to jail time than to convict white defendants, even when they’ve committed similar crimes? x

Why are black people twice as likely as white people to be born prematurely or with a low birthrate, even when controlling for education and socioeconomic class? x

Why are any of the phenomena described in these charts taking place? x

These are just a few examples of modern-day racism. If racism against white people existed, that would mean that people of color would have sufficient control of institutions like the media, the school and university systems, the medical systems, and the government to oppress white people. We do not have that power. White people do. Even if they truly don’t hate or see themselves as superior to POCs, white people as a group have benefits that POCs as a group do not have.